Classical music translated into fabric patterns…

The fabric of sound

London-based studio BeatWoven have been putting the visual patterns created by music onto their fabrics to create beautiful interior design pieces.

London-based studio BeatWoven have been putting the visual patterns created by music onto their fabrics to create beautiful interior design pieces.

Founder and textile designer Nadia-Anne Ricketts uses a bespoke audio software program that inspects the beats and sounds in the music and translates it into geometric visual patterns. The patterns are then woven into luxurious fabrics for many uses.

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Ricketts has done numerous pieces and was recently commissioned to do a textile piece for Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2.

She found that visually, classical music and electronic music and jazz music make noticeably different patterns. “There is more background space on classical music. House music, or electronic music, is more full-on in terms of patterns, sometimes creating some fantastic shapes due to the synthesizers.”

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Ricketts says “To be able to express the intangible of music, through woven textiles is super special, as it creates tactile music with an added narrative to any interior space.”

You can see how the team here at Amphio got on trying to visualise sound in a similar way here.

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